The Uncomfortable Insects of Sarah Garzoni

We frequently use insects as tools in industry, science, art and agriculture. We keep them as pets, kill them for clothes, and patent their genes. In that uncomfortable vein is a great collection of insect-related works from Sarah Garzoni. Though some of her most powerful and provocative works involve vertebrates such as upholstered pigs and shark-tooth corsets, insects get their fair share of complicated attention:

Sarah Garzoni, Nike (from Mimésis), 2002

Sarah Garzoni, Camouflage (from Mimésis), 2002

Sarah Garzoni, Cibles (from Mimésis), 2002

For Mimésis, butterfly wings were run through an ink-jet printer, than re-assembled and pinned. The art-dork in me is amused by one with this signature:

Sarah Garzoni, R. Mutt (from Mimésis), 2002

Sarah Garzoni, Rhéa, 2008

Rhéa is a beautiful melding of stick insect and plant life, held in check under a glass dome.

Sarah Garzoni, Homo-Faber, 2006

I must admit a certain jealousy to this last one, as I have sketchbooks from college of much the same thing: Swiss Army knives that sprout forth specialized insect appendages! But like any good unrealized (and perhaps somewhat simplistic) idea, I'm pleased it was actually made manifest, and with skill and humor.  
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2 Responses to The Uncomfortable Insects of Sarah Garzoni

  1. steve says:

    i really love the knife,and stick insect .They look so cool i would have that knife on my wall if i could

  2. I also love the ‘beetle Swiss army knife’. I think the knife captures both the fear many people have of insects, due to the perceived threat of danger, while also representing the usefulness of insects. Insects make a great theme for artworks as they have such interesting and diverse range of shapes, colours and textures. I hope you don’t mind, but I’ve added a link to your page from my latest Kazs Creatures blog post about being inspired by insects to create artistic pieces. http://kazscreatures.blogspot.com/2011/08/from-chomped-up-garden-to-craftsmanship.html

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